media logos

Get your event tickets via text message

We make no mistake of it: we’re avid baseball fans. During the months spanning April through October, we’re perpetually in a good mood, knowing that we can watch a game on all but two nights of the year (damned All-Star break). What does this have to do with mobile phones, you ask? Well, if you’re a fan of the Kansas City Royals, Washington Nationals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Oakland A’s, or Texas Rangers, you can have your tickets sent right to your cell phone via text message. Speaking from the experience of an impulse ticket buyer, this is an enormous convenience.

See, when we buy tickets the day before or the day of a game, we have to make a trip to the will-call booth. Sometimes, there is no line and we’re with our tickets lickety split. Other times — usually weekends — the line is swamped; we have to get to the stadium at least a half-hour before game time if we want to see the first pitch. But if the tickets are texted to us, we don’t have to wait on two lines.

Of course, there is always the option to print your tickets at home. This doesn’t make the ticket texting any less valuable, though. One thing that causes much undue stress before leaving for a game is remembering the tickets. ‘Cause if you get there without them, you’re SOL. It’s a rare occasion to forget one’s phone, though, and it’s one less thing to remember.

So now when we jump off the subway, we can head right to our gate, rather than toiling in a ticket line, then standing in line to be frisked.

Experiments in ticket texting are also being conducted in the musical arena. Last month, pop singer Fergie did a quickie private show at a Verizon store in Texas. Tickets were sent to customers’ cell phones. This could certainly lead to a larger exposure in the future.

Yes, it costs a little bit for the service: as much as it costs to print your tickets at home. But with one less line to wait on and one less thing to forget, we have a hard time arguing against having your tickets texted to you.

[Kansas City Business Journal] [Philadelphia Inquirer]