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T-Mobile Doubles Music Freedom Options

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If you like rocking out to tunes this holiday season, then T-Mobile has a Christmas gift for you! Their popular Music Freedom service has been more than doubled this week to include 14 additional music streaming services to their free music revolution. The wildly popular music freedom service streams roughly 66 million songs per day.

Here is the full list of services, with the newly added in bold:

  •  AccuRadio
  • Black Planet
  • Digitally Imported
  • Fit Radio
  • Fresca Radio
  • Google Play Music
  • Grooveshark
  • iHeartRadio
  • iTunes Radio
  • JAZZRADIO
  • Live365
  • Mad Genius Radio
  • Pandora
  • radio.com
  • Radio Paradise
  • radioPup
  • RadioTunes
  • Rdio
  • Rhapsody
  • ROCKRADIO
  • Saavn
  • Samsung Milk Music
  • Slacker
  • SoundCloud
  • Songza
  • Spotify
  • Xbox Music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, it’s a pretty impressive lineup and includes a lot of variety from Jazz to dance music to popular hits and build-your-own services like iHeartRadio and Spotify.

Music Freedom is available for both prepaid and postpaid consumers and basically gives users an unlimited pool of data to be used soely for music streaming. This data doesn’t count against the normal data bucket. However, the fine print states that the advertisements and album artwork WILL count against your data, so streaming for long periods of time is still going to count against you, just not half as much as it would normally.

This service is automatically included in T-Mobile prepaid accounts that include data (generally the $50 plans and up). If you don’t have a qualifying plan, you can add Music Freedom to your account for a small fee. Once again, it is likely going to cost you a little bit of data, so keep an eye on your counter when streaming.

The press release stated that the free music streaming would be a key factor to switch to T-Mobile for 1 in 4 people, so clearly the music business is treating the magenta carrier quite well and it’s certainly not a bad thing for consumers either. I love win-win situations.